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Monday, January 15, 2018

Problem of the Week 1-16-18: Trigonometric Identity [Trigonometry]

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Solution below.

Tuesday, January 2, 2018

Problem of the Week 1-2-18: Unit Square [Geometry]

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Solution below.

Tuesday, December 26, 2017

Problem of the Week 12-26-17: License Plate [Probability]

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Solution below.

Thursday, December 21, 2017

Math History Youtube Mini-Series: The History of Greek Mathematics




Mathematics has long been a unifying element across cultures around the globe. Beginning first as a tool used for counting and practical problems, Mathematics eventually came to be an intellectual interest producing theories and ideas that described the world. As one of the most pursued sciences, Math has built off itself creating new ideas on the backs of old ones. The study of Math history attempts to document and understand this path that Mathematics has taken from antiquity to now. Below you may watch this new mini-series on Math History which focuses on the breakthroughs made in the early years of Mathematics in Greece.


This series is meant to be a short introduction to Math History and as such covers only part of the Mathematical discoveries of one culture. Greek mathematicians as a whole did much to learn from and expand upon the knowledge established by the civilizations before it. Yet, within this series we have left out many Mathematicians that were instrumental in the development of Greek Mathematics in favor of focusing on three of the most well know Greek mathematicians: Pythagoras, Euclid, and Archimedes. This series in chronological order covers the beginning of Mathematics in Greece and the Greek numeral system, Pythagoras and his followers, Euclid and the Elements,  and Archimedes and the Method of Exhaustion.

If you are interested in this series and would like to learn more about Math History as a field or the cultures we did not cover in this series, there is a short list at the end of this post with resources and texts to look into. We also have another blog post with a short three part guide on the History of Babylonian Mathematics that you may read through. The history of Mathematics is populated with numerous individuals and ideas who helped to shape modern Mathematics today, and they are just as important as the ones we choose to include in this mini-series. Egyptian, Babylonian, Chinese, Roman, Islamic and countless other cultures contributed to the overall growth of Mathematical knowledge.

We hope you enjoy this mini-series on the History of Greek Mathematics!

Wednesday, December 20, 2017

Math History Guide: The History of Babylonian Mathematics



Mathematics has long been a unifying element across cultures around the globe. Beginning first as a tool used for counting and practical problems, Mathematics eventually came to be an intellectual interest producing theories and ideas that described the world. As one of the most pursued sciences, Math has built off itself creating new ideas on the backs of old ones. The study of Math history attempts to document and understand the path that Mathematics has taken from antiquity to now. Below you may read our guide series on the History of Babylonian Mathematics in three parts.

These documents are meant to be a quick introduction to some of the themes and ideas from one of the early civilizations of Math History. Within this series we have left out minor discoveries or examples in preference for ideas that are important in the context of modern Mathematics. Babylonian Mathematics was essential in helping to spread ideas that led to the further development of Math in later civilizations. This series is separated into three parts, the Babylonian writing system and its modern translation, general arithmetic problems and how they were solved, and mathematical results relating to modern day notions.

If you are interested in this series and would like to learn more about Math History as a field or the cultures we did not cover in this series, there is a short list at the end of this post with resources and texts to look into. We also have another blog post introducing our YouTube mini-series on the History of Greek Mathematics that you may watch. The history of Mathematics is populated with numerous individuals and ideas who helped to shape modern Mathematics today, and they are just as important as the ones we choose to include in this short guide. Egyptian, Greek, Chinese, Roman, Islamic and countless other cultures contributed to the overall growth of Mathematical knowledge.

We hope you enjoy this short guide on the History of Babylonian Mathematics!